In 2014, in an effort to save money, the City of Flint switched its water supply to water drawn from the highly contaminated Flint River. That change set into motion a series of events that ended with many of the City’s nearly 8,000 small children permanently harmed by lead poisoning, and many of the City’s 50,000 housing units rendered nearly worthless because of corroded, unsafe pipes and appliances.

Cohen Milstein has brought suit in state court on behalf of Flint residents harmed by the City’s lead crisis. According to the complaint, engineering firms Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam (LAN) and Veolia, both major professional companies with experience in water systems, gave the City disastrously bad advice about the switch to Flint River water. When Flint’s citizens complained about the new water’s bad smell, color, and taste—and later, when the City suffered an outbreak of deadly Legionnaires’ disease—the engineering companies failed to identify corroding pipes as the root cause of the City’s problems. Had they taken even the most basic steps required of professional engineers, they would have discovered that Flint River water was eight times more corrosive than the City’s previous water source, and they would have taken steps to prevent the leaching of dangerous lead into residents’ water supply.

Instead, LAN and Veolia made the problem worse. They recommended that the City double the water system’s dose of ferric chloride—a highly acidic chemical that only compounded the City’s corrosion problem. Rather than anticipating and ameliorating the water’s increased corrosivity, LAN and Veolia did nothing to prevent added ferric chloride from further eating away at Flint’s lead pipes.

As a result, lead concentrations in Flint water reached astonishingly high levels—in one case, as much as 880 times the EPA’s legal limit. The toxic lead made its way into residents’ water, and then their blood—a circumstance that is particularly hard for Flint’s children. Lead poisoning is known to cause serious damage to children’s central and peripheral nervous systems, stunt growth, reduce IQ, and cause serious behavioral problems. The effects of these symptoms can reverberate across a child’s entire lifespan.

Flint’s corrosive water has also caused devastating damages to residents’ property. The water has permanently corroded pipes and appliances connected to the Flint water system—leaving many residents in a vicious catch-22. Because of the damages to their pipes caused by LAN’s and Veolia’s negligence, Flint residents’ homes are no longer valuable enough to serve as collateral for the loans they need to fix their pipes and purchase new, safe appliances. Instead, the residents are stuck in dangerous homes, unable to afford the price of safety.

Cohen Milstein’s complaint seeks damages on behalf of Flint residents and businesses who have been harmed by LAN’s and Veolia’s negligence. The complaint was filed in Genesee County Circuit Court on July 6, 2016.