May 23, 2018

Nikki Albino said her teacher and resource officer at a Palm Beach County school sexually abused her when she was 12-years-old. She said she finally had the courage to come forward but when she filed an official police report she was shocked to hear what the investigating officer told her. 

“The statute of limitations is up on this case,” Albino recalled. “Because it was some 20 odd years ago, there’s nothing he can do.”

The teacher is still working in the school district and has been removed from the classroom, pending the outcome of the internal investigation. 

For Albino, that’s not enough. 

“I’m hurt. I feel powerless,” Albino said. 

Attorney Michael Dolce, who is a survivor of sexual abuse himself, said suppressed memory is very common in sexual abuse cases, especially those involving children. 

“The average delay in reporting is estimated at 15 years,” Dolce said. Fifteen years. But when Albino’s abuse happened, Florida gave the survivors only 4 years to come forward.

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“There should be no statute of limitations,” Damiani said. 

Dolce agreed. 

We do have one particular crime in the state of Florida for which there is no statute of limitation and that’s murder,” Dolce said. “I think for any sex offense we should have no statute of limitations as well. Because at the end of the day, I can tell you that, I’ve been in recovery with multiple sex crime victims who have killed themselves. That’s their death. I don’t think there should be a statute of limitations that led to that.”

 

The full newsclip and article can be accessed here.