Raymond M. Sarola is an Associate at Cohen Milstein, and a member of the Firm’s Whistleblower/False Claims Act and the Ethics and Fiduciary Counseling practice groups. Mr. Sarola represents whistleblowers in cases brought under the federal and state false claims acts in a wide range of industries that conduct business with the government, including health care, defense and financial services.  As a member of the Firm’s Ethics and Fiduciary Counseling practice, Mr. Sarola calls on his experience as a trustee on the New York City pension fund boards in counseling public pension funds fiduciary issues.

Mr. Sarola’s experience includes both government service and corporate litigation. Prior to joining the firm, he served as Senior Policy Advisor & Counsel in the Mayor's Office of the City of New York.  While there, he represented the Mayor and Commissioner of Finance on the boards of the City's pension systems and deferred compensation plan and advised on legal issues regarding pension investments, benefit payments, securities litigation and corporate governance initiatives.  Previously, Mr. Sarola was a litigation associate at a noted defendants’ firm, where he represented companies and individuals in securities and other complex commercial litigation, internal investigations and antitrust matters.

 

Most recently, Mr. Sarola assisted in the qui tam action against the pharmaceutical company Wyeth pending in the District of Massachusetts, in which more states joined to intervene along with the government of the United States than have ever intervened in a qui tam action in history. (United States of America et al., ex rel. Lauren Kieff, v. Wyeth, No.1:03-CV-12366-DPW [D.Mass.].) The $784.6 million settlement was the seventh-largest False Claims Act recovery on record and the second-largest recovery involving a class of drugs in history.

Mr. Sarola has published articles on whistleblower issues, including the use of statistical sampling to prove large fraud cases.  He has also published and spoken at conferences on pension fund fiduciary issues, in particular the SEC’s pay-to-play rule.  He is a member of Taxpayers Against Fraud, a nonprofit, public interest organization dedicated to combating fraud against the Federal Government through the promotion and use of the False Claims Act.

Mr. Sarola received his B.A. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and earned his J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, where he also earned a Certificate of Study in Business and Public Policy from the Wharton School.  While in law school, he was a Summer Intern for the Honorable Clarence Newcomer, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

  • Senior Policy Advisor and Counsel, Mayor's Office, City of New York, 2010-2014
  • Intern, the Hon. Judge Clarence Newcomer, U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, 2003